Southwest Louisiana Tea Party

Fiscal Responsibility - Limited Government - Free Market

It's Official . . . Louisiana Files Convention of States (COS) Article V Application

It's official ... Louisiana House has officially filed the Convention of States Article V Application.

http://www.legis.la.gov/legis/BillInfo.aspx?i=225186

HCR6 - U.S. CONSTITUTION: Applies to congress to call a convention of the states limited to proposing amendments to the U.S. Constitution that impose fiscal restraints on the federal government, limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, and limit terms of office for U.S. officials and for members of congress 

http://www.legis.la.gov/legis/BillInfo.aspx?i=225210

HCR15 - U.S. CONSTITUTION: Applies to congress under U.S. Const. Art. V to call a convention of the states to propose U.S. constitutional amendments to impose fiscal restraints on the federal government, limit federal government power, and provide for term limits for federal officials and members of congress

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Tags: Application, Article V, COS, Convention of States, Louisiana

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Comment by Tif Morgan on September 6, 2015 at 6:29pm

Tommy,

 We found something, and was shocked to find out back in the 70's they had a Convention of the States, and hid the Convention in a irs data base. The Convention of the States, will move forward, but there will be a lot of people voted out of office or removed.

The United States Supreme ruled that the IRS Tax forum was Unconstitutional, more so in the w2 case.

 The Irs was established in England, and our taxes went that way. Our members of congress violated a  Supreme Court ruling and had a behind the door COS get together. Convention of States is now bring a fight against the Irs. There is no Law supporting the IRs.

 by Mark Meckler
 
Our nation is in crisis right now, and we need some serious changes in order to save what's left of our country for our posterity.

Do you want term limits on Congress?
    Do you want term limits on the Supreme Court?
    Do you want fiscal restraints on the federal government that go way beyond a balanced budget?
    Do you want to get rid of the Department oother agencies?
    Do you want to have a legitimate discussion about repealing the 17th amendment?
    Do you want to have a legitimate discussion about repealing the 16th amendment and getting rid of the IRS?

COS give you those things. You have the right to stand up in this fight for liberty.
 
Last month, Mark Meckler  spoke to a room of over 200 state legislators about why a Convention of States to limit the power of the federal government is the only solution to our declining nation. Only through a Convention of States will be people be able to regain control of their government & their lives.
While I was inspired by those legislators, I am even more inspired by you, the grassroots activist. As a soldier in the fight for liberty, you endure and sacrifice so much in the hope that one day, our nation will be restored.
Mark Meckler
President
Convention of States Action
100 Congress Ave Ste 2000
Austin, TX 78701

Exhibit #05.051: Former IRS Commissioner Steven Miller says the income tax is "voluntary"

 Part 1

UNITED STATES-UNITED KINGDOM INCOME TAX CONVENTION
Convention Signed at London December 31, 1975;
Exchange of Notes Signed at London April 13, 1976;
First Protocol Signed at London August 26,1976;
Second Protocol Signed at London March 31, 1977;
Third Protocol Signed at London March 15,1979;
Ratification of the Convention, Exchange of Notes and the First Two Protocols Advised by the
Senate of the United States of America June 27,1978;
Ratification of the Third Protocol Advised by the Senate of the United States of America
July 9,1979;
Convention, Exchange of Notes, and First Two Protocols Ratified by the President of the United
States of America August 1, 1978;
Third Protocol Ratified by the President of the United States of America August 24, 1979;
Convention, Exchange of Notes, and Three Protocols Ratified by the United Kingdom of Great
Britain and Northern Ireland March 10, 1980;
Ratifications Exchanged at Washington March 25,1980;
Proclaimed by the President of the United States of America April 9, 1980;
Entered into Force April 25, 1980.
GENERAL EFFECTIVE DATE UNDER ARTICLE 28: 1 JANUARY 1975
TABLE OF ARTICLES
Article 1---------------------------------Personal Scope
Article 2---------------------------------Taxes Covered
Article 3---------------------------------General Definitions
Article 4 --------------------------------Fiscal Residence
Article 5 --------------------------------Permanent Establishment
Article 6 --------------------------------Income from Immovable Property (Real Property)
Article 7 --------------------------------Business Profits
Article 8 --------------------------------Shipping and Air Transport
Article 9 --------------------------------Associated Enterprises
Article 10 -------------------------------Dividends
Article 11 -------------------------------Interest
Article 12 -------------------------------Royalties
Article 13 -------------------------------Capital Gains
Article 14 -------------------------------Independent Personal Services
Article 15 -------------------------------Dependent Personal Services
Article 16 -------------------------------Investment or Holding Companies
Article 17 -------------------------------Artistes and Athletes
Article 18 -------------------------------Pensions
Article 19 -------------------------------Government Service
Article 20 -------------------------------Teachers
Article 21--------------------------------Students and Trainees
Article 22 -------------------------------Other Income
Article 23 -------------------------------Elimination of Double Taxation
Article 24 -------------------------------Non-discrimination
Article 25 -------------------------------Mutual Agreement Procedure
Article 26 -------------------------------Exchange of Information and Administrative Assistance
Article 27 -------------------------------Effect on Diplomatic and Consular Officials
and Domestic Laws
Article 28 -------------------------------Entry into Force
Article 29 -------------------------------Termination
Notes of Exchange---------------------of 13 April, 1976
Letter of Submittal---------------------of 8 June, 1976
Letter of Transmittal-------------------of 24 June, 1976
Protocol 1-------------------------------of 26 August, 1976
Letter of Submittal (Protocol 1)------of 15 September, 1976
Letter of Transmittal (Protocol 1)----of 22 September, 1976
Protocol 2--------------------------------of 31 March, 1977
Letter of Submittal (Protocol 2)------of 10 May, 1977
Letter of Transmittal (Protocol 2)----of 6 June, 1977
Protocol 3--------------------------------of 15 March, 1979
Letter of Submittal (Protocol 3)------of 3 April, 1979
Letter of Transmittal (Protocol 3)----of 12 April, 1979
The “Saving Clause”-------------------Paragraph 3 of Article 1
TAX CONVENTION WITH THE UNITED KINGDOM
OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND
MESSAGE
FROM
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
TRANSMITTING
THE CONVENTION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA AND THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN
AND NORTHERN IRELAND FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION AND THE
PREVENTION OF FISCAL EVASION WITH RESPECT TO TAXES ON INCOME SIGNED
AT LONDON ON DECEMBER 31, 1975, AND AN EXCHANGE OF NOTES SIGNED
AT LONDON ON APRIL 13, 1976, MODIFYING CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE
CONVENTION
LETTER OF SUBMITTAL
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, June 8, 1976.
The PRESIDENT,
The White House.
The PRESIDENT: I have the honor to submit to you, with a view to its transmission to the Senate
for advice and consent to ratification, the Convention between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the Avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income signed at London on December 31, 1975, and an exchange of notes signed at London on April 13, 1976, modifying certain provisions of the Convention.
The proposed Convention with the United Kingdom is similar in its essential respects to other recent United States income tax treaties, and to the model income tax convention of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. There are, however, several provisions in the Convention with the United Kingdom which require special comment.
Article 10 (Dividends) represents a new approach to meshing, by treaty, two tax systems which
differ sharply in their treatment of corporations and their shareholders - the "classical system" in the United States, under which corporate profits and dividend income are taxed separately in the hands of the corporation and the shareholder, and the British "imputation System" under which a portion of the tax collected at the corporate level (known as The Advance Corporation Tax "Act") is refunded to a United Kingdom shareholder to satisfy his tax liability on a dividend distribution. Under the United Kingdom system which was enacted in 1973, nonresident shareholders do not receive this refund. We believe this represents discrimination against United States investors in the United Kingdom vis-a-vis United Kingdom investors.
The provisions of Article 10 of the draft treaty mitigate this discriminatory element in the British system. The British will, under the treaty, make payments to U.S. investors equivalent, in part or in whole, to the ACT credit allowed to United Kingdom investors. United States portfolio investors, defined as owning less than ten percent of the shares of the United Kingdom corporation, will receive, in addition to the dividend, a payment equal to the full credit allowed to United Kingdom investors. From the total amount paid (the dividend plus the credit payment) the United Kingdom will withhold 15 percent. For direct investors (corporations owning more than ten percent of the shares of the United Kingdom corporation), the payment will equal one-half of the credit allowed to United Kingdom shareholders and from the total amount paid, a tax of five percent will be withheld. This latter provision represents a substantial concession by the United Kingdom because under United Kingdom law, only individual domestic shareholders receive the ACT credit.
This provision is significant beyond the immediate context of the United Kingdom treaty, because it presently appears that an imputation system similar to that in the United Kingdom will be the approach adopted by the European Economic Community in harmonizing the income tax Systems of the member countries. France already has such a system.
In order to clarify the United States tax treatment of the ACT, the treaty provides that the credit payments by the United Kingdom will be treated as dividend income to United States shareholders and that a foreign tax credit will be allowed for the portions of the ACT credit not refunded.
The United States will reduce its withholding rates to 15 percent on dividends to United Kingdom portfolio investors and to five percent on dividends to United Kingdom parent corporations. This
reduction follows the pattern adopted in other United States treaties.
A second new provision is found in paragraph 4 of Article 9 (Associated Enterprises). This
provision represents the first attempt to bind State and local taxing authorities by a substantive provision of the treaty (other than non-discrimination). Under the basic rules of our other tax conventions a Contracting State entering into such tax conventions is prohibited from taking into account, in determining the tax liability of an enterprise doing business in that Contracting State, the income, expenses, etc. of related enterprises of the other Contracting State or in other countries if those enterprises are not engaged in business in the Contracting State, except to the extent that inter-company transactions are not conducted on an arm's length basis. This treaty, for the first time, extends this limitation to State and local tax authorities with respect to enterprises controlled by United Kingdom residents. This limitation is directed at the practice of a few States which are attempting to take into account the income on a consolidated basis of all related foreign enterprises in assessing the State income tax of a single member of the related group doing business in the State. This method of assessment, which includes the burden of producing worldwide records of all of the affiliated companies, has raised many objections by our treaty partners and we are now seeking to deal specifically with this problem in our treaties. This broadening of the scope of the treaty has been discussed informally with the Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee.
The treaty provides for reciprocal exemption from withholding on interest and royalty payments
from payers in one Contracting State received by residents of the other. Such exemption is provided in the existing treaty.
The treaty also clarifies the manner in which the United Kingdom may tax the United States source income of United States citizens residing in the United Kingdom and United Kingdom branches of United States corporations. The treaty generally allows the United Kingdom to tax such income, but in so doing, the United Kingdom must first allow a credit against its tax for any United States tax paid with respect to the same income. This rule is consistent with our other recent treaties and the OECD Model Convention. The remaining provisions of the draft treaty, dealing with the taxation of business profits, personal service income and administrative matters are patterned largely after other recent United States income tax treaties.
The exchange of notes dated April 13, 1976, was entered into on the basis of information
communicated to both governments since public release of the December 31, 1975, Convention. It was called to our attention that a number of corporations have been organized under the existing taxconvention as dual residents of the United States and the United Kingdom on the assumption that certain benefits of the present treaty flow to such dual residents and their shareholders. Paragraph 2 of Article 1 of the convention signed on December 31 excluded all dual resident corporations from benefits under the new treaty. The proposed note modifies this provision by extending treaty benefits to residents of the United States and the United Kingdom who receive income from dual resident corporations and provides that the United Kingdom Petroleum Revenue tax will be a creditable income tax in the case of a dual resident corporation.
The April 13, 1976, exchanges of notes amended Article 8 (Shipping and Air Transport) to
broaden the tax exemption for containers used in international traffic.
Paragraph 4 of Article 9 (Associated Enterprises) was restated to make it clear that the United
States and States of the United States may not take into account the income or deductions of a related enterprise which is a resident of the other Contracting State unless such enterprise is engaged in business in the taxing jurisdiction or has had business transactions with a related enterprise and the adjustment is made on an arm's length basis. The rule has been restated to make it clear that this limitation on Federal and State tax rules applies only to corporations controlled by United Kingdom interests and eliminates any suggestion in the text of December 31 that United States based companies or third country companies might obtain coverage under this rule merely by establishing a United Kingdom affiliate.
Article 16 (Investment or Holding Companies) was liberalized in order to permit certain financing companies established in the United States to benefit from reduced treaty rates by the United Kingdom. Additional changes in the note are conforming amendments.
The Convention and exchange of notes will enter into force thirty days after the date of exchange of instruments of ratification and then have effect as provided in Article 28. This Convention and exchange of notes shall remain in force indefinitely subject to the right of either party to terminate it by giving notice of termination on or before June 30 in any year after the year 1980 pursuant to the procedure found in Article 29.
The Department of the Treasury, with the cooperation of the Department of State, was primarily
responsible for the negotiation of this Convention. It has the approval of both Departments.
Respectfully submitted,
C. W. ROBINSON
Acting Secretary.
Enclosure: Convention and exchange of notes.
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
THE WHITE HOUSE, June 24, 1976.
To the Senate of the United States

Comment by Tif Morgan on June 28, 2015 at 8:14am

There is one thing that needs to be noted, all to many people do not understand the COS Program, and our team we are just people learning the Constitution and I have to admit I did not know that the Constitution was created for a Republic of America, not Democracy.

 Anyway, activism is a key element for moving COS forward and protecting it from control and at the same time bring into play the good with the bad issues. So for a long time my dad hammered the internet because of Government Spending, and as of now the spending is around $160 Trillion Dollars. COS picked up on the political battle to expose the spending.

 Convention of States- $127 Trillion In Unfunded Liabilities, The News Networks are paying attention, to the Anonymous release of the amount of funds borrowed by officials of the United States Government from the federal reserve.

First News update- From Convention of States-
Coburn on USA Today: A convention of states can restore our Constitution

http://www.conventionofstates.com/coburn_usa_today_convention_can_r...

Posted by Sen. Tom Coburn M.D. on April 30, 2015

The following excerpt was originally published on USA Today.

From the very beginning of our country, Americans have wrestled with how best to govern ourselves within the framework of the Constitution. Do we want a strong federal government, or a weaker one? Do we want decisions made closer to home, or in a faraway capital? Does the Constitution itself mean what it says, or have interpretations over time stripped it of its original meaning?

Republicans and Democrats in Congress and in the White House have agreed time and time again to keep spending more money we do not have to pay for things we do not need.

Today our national debt exceeds $18 trillion which equates to more than $220,000 for a family of four. That's in excess of $30,000 more than the median home price in this country. In other words, Washington has saddled every family in the country with a debt far exceeding their own home before they've even gotten out of bed in the morning, and that's before we even get to the $127 trillion in unfunded liabilities that faces our children and grandchildren.
Posted by Sen. Tom Coburn M.D. on April 30, 2015

The following excerpt was originally published on USA Today:http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2015/04/29/national-debt-wash...

Convention of States- $127 Trillion In Unfunded Liabilities

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEoo2zIxKQw

Comment by Tif Morgan on June 27, 2015 at 4:10pm

Article V Convention of States is of a interest to our friends and The Network.

Comment by Tommy Buch on March 11, 2014 at 9:31pm

Update . . . 

HCR6 - 03/11 - House Chamber - Read by title, under the rules, referred to the Committee on House and Governmental Affairs.

HCR15 - 03/11 - House Chamber - Read by title, under the rules, referred to the Committee on House and Governmental Affairs.

==========================================

TAKE ACTION . . .

Here's the link to the 11 members of the House and Governmental Affairs Committee:

http://house.louisiana.gov/H_Cmtes/H_CMTE_HG.asp

Please call, fax, mail, e-mail or visit them in person asking them to join with the other states in passing this Article V Application.

The members' phone, fax and mailing addresses are listed here:

http://house.louisiana.gov/H_Cmtes/H_Cmte_HGaddresses.asp

The members' e-mail address is listed here:

http://house.louisiana.gov/H_Reps/H_Reps_Email.asp

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